Our Specialisms

Specialisms

Each UTC has one or more sector specialism linked to their local industry partners. Learning at a UTC is structured around a thematic approach that taps into these key areas of local and national economic growth.

Engineering

Engineering and manufacturing is one of the UK’s broadest sectors and according to EngineeringUK, workers within the sector accounted for 19% of all UK employees in 2018.

Due to the sector-wide skills shortage, employment prospects for engineering and manufacturing graduates look good.

EngineeringUK’s 2019 update on the state of the sector reported that 62% of engineering and technology graduates were in full-time employment six months after graduating, compared to 57% of all graduates.

The same report also estimates that there will be an annual demand for 124,000 engineers and technicians with core engineering skills up to 2024, alongside an additional requirement for 79,000 related roles, requiring a mixed application of engineering knowledge and skill alongside other skill sets.

Digital

Tech is expanding 2.6 times faster than the rest of the UK economy, according to Tech Nation’s 2018 report. The digital tech sector is worth nearly £184 billion to UK economy, up from £170 billion in 2016.

Digital

Tech is expanding 2.6 times faster than the rest of the UK economy, according to Tech Nation’s 2018 report. The digital tech sector is worth nearly £184 billion to UK economy, up from £170 billion in 2016.

The UK’s digital tech sector continues to accelerate faster than the rest of the economy, according to Tech Nation 2018. Turnover of digital tech companies grew by 4.5% between 2016-17 compared to UK GDP which grew by 1.7% over the same period, according to the figures. At the same time the number of jobs in digital tech rose at five times the rate of the rest of the economy, demonstrating how the digital tech sector is one of the best performing sectors in the UK economy. The digital tech sector is worth nearly £184 billion to UK economy, up from £170 billion in 2016. London ranks as the second most connected place for tech in the world, after Silicon Valley.

The high growth year on year proves once and for all that that the creative industries are outperforming the UK economy as a whole.

Design

The Department for Culture, Media and Sport values the UK creative industries as a whole at £76.9 billion. The sectors as a whole is up nearly 10% from last year, growing at three times the rate of the wider UK economy, and with design itself growing at double the rate. From 2011-13, jobs in product, graphic and fashion design increased by 17.7% to 177,000 jobs. This means that the UK now has the second-largest design sector in the world and the largest design industry in Europe.

Design

Creative Media

With an estimated 2,040,000 jobs – 75 per cent of them outside London – the UK’s creative industries are developing new jobs faster than other sectors despite record employment in the UK economy as a whole.

In 2018 the creative industries grew jobs by 1.6 per cent, compared to the UK-wide employment increase of 0.8 per cent. Between 2011 and 2018, creative industries employment has mushroomed by 30.6 per cent, compared to the UK average growth of 10.1 per cent during that period.

In the wider creative economy, which counts creative occupations in other sectors to roles specifically in the creative industries, the total number of UK jobs is 3.2m or 9.6 per cent of all UK jobs (by comparison, the wider digital economy accounts for 2.2m jobs or 6.8 per cent of all roles).

Creative industries continued to power the growth of the UK’s workforce last year, adding new posts at twice the rate of the rest of the economy, according to official data.

With an estimated 2,040,000 jobs – 75 per cent of them outside London – the UK’s creative industries are developing new jobs faster than other sectors despite record employment in the UK economy as a whole.

Science

Life sciences is among a select group of highly innovative industries linked to science and tech which could be responsible for a new wave of growth worth an extra £14 billion a year to the UK economy by 2025. The sector has the potential to create 56,000 additional jobs, according to analysis commissioned by the ABPI. But the trade body is also warning that for the life-sciences industry to create the most commercial value and jobs, it needs the strongest possible environment for R&D investment, a highly skilled workforce and to prevent the drain of STEM students to the EU and the rest of the world.​

Life sciences could add an extra £8.5 billion of growth to the economy by 2025, plus an additional 31,400 more jobs;

Aerospace could add £4.5 billion a year by 2025 and 17,200 more jobs;

Clean energy could add £1 billion in growth and 7,400 more jobs.

Health

Health

The largest employer in the UK healthcare sector is the NHS, which employs more than 1.5 million people – placing it in the top five largest workforces in the world. There are more than 350 different roles available within the NHS.

In 2017, spending on healthcare in the UK totalled £197.4 billion. This equates to approximately £2,989 spent per person, or 9.6% of gross domestic product (GDP). This includes both government and non-government spending on healthcare.

Construction

The annual Construction Skills Network (CSN) report – a five-year forecast into the industry’s skills needs – anticipates construction growth of 1.3% across the UK, down a third of a percent on the previous year. The forecast is based on the scenario that the UK agrees an exit deal with the EU, rather than a ‘No Deal’ situation. The biggest increase is expected in public housing, which is pulling ahead as infrastructure slows. Financial support from Government at both local and national levels is encouraging a 3.2% growth rate in public housing, up half a percent since last year’s forecast.

Construction